Classroom Tour

Drumroll, please…

The classroom is finally ready to go!  Well, mostly.  It’s at least to the point where I feel prepared to receive students.  Without further adieu…

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Here’s the entrance area. (As a yearbook adviser, I feel compelled to put out the disclaimer that the awkward empty space at the top of the bulletin board is KILLING me, but I know it will be filled with flyers and information once school starts so I’m letting it go.)

I teach theology at a catholic school, so I need to set the tone when you first step in the room.  On the front bulletin board, I hung a cross (a souvenir from Italy) and leaned a framed print of different images of Christ on top of the book shelf.  The poster is old and I hope to replace it with a faith themed poster instead. (Etsy, here I come!)  The border on the whiteboard reads, “…teach me your ways so I may know you…Exodus 33:13”. The plan is to use this section of the board for daily prayer intentions.

In addition to teaching theology, I also advise yearbook.  The  bookcase in the front of the room contains yearbook supplies.  The table holds our yearbook “mail center” which is waiting to be updated and organized by the new staff.  The yearbook supplies continue on the other side of the door as well.

The other items on bulletin board are the “essentials” – schedules, the lunch rotation, class sponsors, emergency procedures, etc.  On top of the table is a Mickey Mouse tray which holds extra pens for student use (no touching my nice pens on my desk!), tissues and the bathroom sign-out.  I have 27 desks in my room and no space for extras, but our school hosts middle school visitors each year.  I got the stack of purple chairs from a retiring teacher and pull them out whenever I need a spare seat.

Yearbook area continued.

Yearbook area continued.

The whiteboard in this area is divided into sections for the yearbook staff to utilize (More on this area in a future post). The computers are for my staff’s use. The bulletin board in the back is their’s as well.

Personal area. (The In Style magazine on the desk is not a product placement.  Don't they feature photos of all the places their magazine is taken?  Maybe I can be their back to school issue!)

Personal area. (The In Style magazine on the desk is not a product placement. Don’t they feature photos of all the places their magazine is taken? Maybe I can be their back to school issue!)

This is the back of the classroom and my own little corner. I’m spoiled and get my room all to myself, so this is the are I’ve claimed. The wire shelves contain planning materials and a stack of prayer books. The metal file holder on the top of the desk has six sections – one for each of my classes. My pen holder (Go Cards!) holds my favorite grading pens and behind the desk you can see part of my Keurig (what did teachers do before the Keurig?). The bulletin board next to the wire shelves is my personal board. It changes throughout the year as I find new treasures and receive gifts and cards from students and friends that I want to display. (Featuring my “I’d rather be at Pemberley” sticker!)

In the opposite corner...my other desk!

In the opposite corner…my other desk!

The front desk is my “computer desk” – ShinyNewMonitor(!) has arrived. The bulletin board in this area displays all my photos former students have given me along with a poster that reads, “Wherever you go, you leave a footprint.”

The purple shelves on top of the heater/air conditioner were a bargain I found at Good Will. They came in sets of three and were originally varying shades of blue. I painted them all and stacked them up. They’re a perfect spot to feature some of my treasures and trinkets I’ve collected over the years.

The tall bookshelf has a shelf for each of my four preps. Each theology class has an assigned plastic tray where students turn in papers. I’m a total stickler about the turn-in trays. After 8 years, I’ve learned that it’s best to have one designated area to accept all incoming assignments. If it wasn’t placed in the tray, it wasn’t turned in as far as I’m concerned.

Computer desk.  I really just took this picture to document that it is possible for me to have this desk cleared off.  (I'll need this reminder later.)

Computer desk. I really just took this picture to document that it is possible for me to have this desk cleared off. (I’ll need this reminder later.)

Poster on the podium in the front of the room.  Quote by Rosa Parks.

Poster on the podium in the front of the room. Quote by Rosa Parks.

In addition to finishing the classroom preparations (finally!), I also updated my phone extension list, shared my new classroom technology procedure with some colleagues and updated my class participation logs. Oh, and we had our second welcome back meeting in the morning. This means my grand total of work hours today was 9.5.

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4 thoughts on “Classroom Tour

  1. I spent 3 years on my high school yearbook staff and then made a couple of yearbooks for my daughters’ school… that being said, your ‘awkward’ empty space on your bulletin board made me laugh. To this day I arrange things like I was taught in journalism, and it drives me crazy to see it done wrong! I look forward to reading your other posts… for now I am off to bed.

    • Ugh. The awkward space is still empty. I know I’ll be getting fliers for StuCo elections and sports schedules soon, but for now it’s killing me.

      Thanks for your comment and for reading. Yearbook consumes many hours of my life so I’m sure I’ll have more posts on the topic soon! 🙂

  2. Really like the idea of a bulletin board set-up for prayer intentions. Blessings for a beautiful year.

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